Trip to Amsterdam: the details and the budget

I promised I’d write a blog post on the details of our trip, so this is what I hope to accomplish:

  1. Details of planning
  2. Costs
  3. Assessment

After our trip to Europe last summer (Cologne, Germany and Paris), we decided our one day in Amsterdam wasn’t nearly enough to see everything the city has to offer. We made it to the Anne Frank House and the Van Gogh Museum on that trip, and even though we were both recovering from terrible colds, it was a highlight of the whole trip. I started watching airfares to Amsterdam pretty much as soon as we got back from Paris. I did a bit of research and decided we could likely make it back in May, just after my husband’s finals week and just before the tulip season ended (the major garden, Keukenhof, closes mid to late May).

bikeIn October, I got an alert about a low fare from Kayak.com, and almost couldn’t believe it: $838/ticket, with one layover each way in Philadelphia. Compared to the $1,575 we paid for airfare in July, this seemed an incredible price. I decided to snap it up, and also bought insurance for about $50/ticket, just in case we ended up needing to cancel since we had booked so far in advance. Total: $1,776.72 for airfare and insurance.

Next came apartment hunting. We prefer apartments to hotels, since you get a kitchen and laundry, plus a bit more space to spread out and relax, for either less money or similar to a hotel, plus more privacy and the feeling of living like a local. Similar to finding a place to live, you want to maximize certain things and minimize other things. My main tips for searching for an apartment are:

  1. Figure out priorities before even looking at listings. For us, this was: comfortable bed, location relative to sights and transportation while being relatively quiet, and little amenities like a well-equipped kitchen/bathroom and laundry in the unit so we could pack light. I also noticed that women’s apartments generally appear more comfortable and have more of the little comforts that we’d expect: throw pillows and blankets, a real couch vs. a futon, cooking utensils, nice shampoo you can use so you don’t need to pack it, and even a bottle of nail polish remover if you need it.
  2. Look at the location using Google Street view to get a sense of the neighborhood and what’s nearby. By “walking” your neighborhood before you even arrive, you get a great idea of how it may fit your needs. By doing this, we discovered our location was very residential but was just around the corner from an ice cream/coffee shop and a grocery store.
  3. Check out public transportation to and from the apartment, from the airport, from all the locations you hope to visit, etc. Our location meant we got to skip visiting the Central Station on our first day in Amsterdam, which was good as we were both sleep deprived and carrying heavy backpacks. We got to hop a bus that dropped us less than a mile from the apartment. It was also close to two tram lines: one took us to the Museumplein and one took us toward Centraal Station.

We found a balance of these things with a place in de Pijp, the former student area of Amsterdam that’s south of the canal belt. For 11 nights, it cost $1,484 total, with all fees. It was exactly as we expected, and our host was very lovely, meeting us there and explaining how to use the washing machine, the coffee maker, etc.

apartmentNext was our travel budget and daily activities. This is the one area where you really don’t want to scrimp, because you’re there to see and do things, and you don’t want to be thinking, “Ah, I can’t really afford to go to this museum…” Thankfully, many large cities overcome this by offering a discount card of some type, and Amsterdam is no exception. In our guide books and online, we kept reading about the Museumkaart (Museum Card), and how it was about 60 Euros but got you into over 300 museums in the Netherlands, and over 30 in Amsterdam alone. This generally would pay off if you visited five places with the card, and since we were planning to hit all of the major museums (Rijksmuseum, Van Gogh, Stedelijk), plus whatever else struck our fancy on our 11 day trip, it made a lot of sense. Plus, you can use the card as many times as you like for admission to the same museum, so you can visit for a short period of time and decide to come back if you didn’t have your fill. Also, if you didn’t much like something, you don’t feel like you “wasted” the entry cost.

rembrandtSouvenirs is another area where you can either spend a lot or very little. My limit was about 10 Euros for a single item for myself, plus we brought back many little gifts for family and friends, mainly small things like postcards of art, key rings, notebooks, bracelets, etc. My favorite item I got was the little Playmobil Milk Maid after Vermeer’s painting in the Rijksmuseum. It was 4.90 Euros. I also picked up a little seed pearl bracelet at the Hermitage Museum and basically haven’t taken it off. My husband got a few nice art-related things: a journal, some colored pencils, a Museum Guide for the Rijksmuseum, and a book called “Art Is Therapy,” but none of them cost more than about 15 Euros.

milk maidOne area we didn’t economize as much was on food. We ate out about twice every day (breakfast was always at our apartment), and got coffee many times to help overcome to time change. We could have done more meal planning and packed lunches, but Amsterdam prices are similar to the US: if you’d feel uncomfortable wearing jeans into a restaurant, it’s probably too expensive, whereas we stuck with restaurants filled with people in their 20s and early 30s and the menu items were around 5-10 Euros. This meant that our most expensive meal, after we visited Keukenhof and got over 20,000 steps on our FitBits, was a lovely Neapolitan pizza place where we each got a pizza, plus each got beer, and split a large piece of tiramisu for $41.29 total. Most meals were around $20 or less. Lastly, transportation within the city was easy with our OV chipkaarts for the trams/buses and even the train we took to The Hague. We spent $132.40 on our cards and the costs to load them, and we each had a bit of money left on the cards after our trip to the airport, so we can bring them when we go back someday.

tulipsTotal for food/souvenirs/transportation: $1,794.45 (we had exactly 15 Euros left in cash after leaving the Schiphol airport, so we gave 5 to my cousin who just graduated from high school and kept the 10 for our next trip!).

Grand total: $5,055.17. It was worth every penny.

One other thing I should add is that we have the BarclayCard Arrival MasterCard with chip and PIN, which was absolutely essential in the Netherlands–many places ONLY took cards with chip and PIN, not cash. With the rewards we have racked up this year, we have saved $450 so far, and now that we’re back, we have more points and more reimbursements to do over the next three months, so that $5,055.17 is actually $4,605.17 and dropping. Update: as of 6/5, the new total is $4,486.17. Depending on the bills that come in over the next couple months, that will likely drop by another $73.66 for a grand total of $4,412.51. Not too shabby for a lavish 11 day European vacation!

OBA view

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