On this day

So Facebook’s “On This Day” feature reminded me a couple days ago that I posted this back in October 2009:2009 Dave Ramsey

It’s almost humorous to me now, six years later, to read that. And I want to discuss what a mind shift has taken place in me since then. I spend much more time being intentional about purchases and our overall financial plan, and I feel less anxious about our bigger financial goals.

When we got married, we had budgeted enough to know that we could afford our apartment and living expenses, but hadn’t figured out what to do about debt, savings, retirement, etc. I was 27, and my husband was 26 when we got married in 2008, and I think we were pretty typical in that we’d discussed some financial stuff before marriage and in our first year of being married, but not other things. We both had mounting student loans, since we got married while we were both in school (him completing a second bachelor’s degree, me completing my master’s degree). Even before graduating in May 2009, I felt the pressure to get a good job in order to start paying my student loan debt. My husband’s debts weren’t nearly as large, but 2009 was rough for him in other ways, and he needed a new direction in life, and so we both began new jobs within a couple months of each other. We had no credit card debt and two older vehicles that we owned outright.

But when Steve’s aunt mentioned Dave Ramsey to us in the summer of 2009, we were both intrigued. I got one of his books at the library when we got home, and must have been reading through it and thinking about in October. My first student loan payment came due in November 2009, and I had just started my new job on October 6. If you’ve been reading along with me, or have read the archives, you already know how things turned out. We now have a positive net worth, no debt, and still no mortgage (at least while my husband is graduate school).

The major change is that I feel that I know a heck of a lot more about money and am much more financially savvy now. Dave Ramsey was a great first step, and the snowball method of eliminating debt worked exactly as it does, with people, on average, paying off their debts in around four years. But I’ve done a lot of other reading (and listening to podcasts like Planet Money), and feel confident in most of the financial decision-making situations in which I find myself. For example, open enrollment for health insurance is just around the corner, but I’ve already got a spreadsheet set up and next year’s spending plan laid out, so I can simply plug in some numbers to see what’s best financially for us. There’s no more big question marks looming in our financial picture. Of course, anything can happen, but there’s more security in having a plan and a backup plan than having no plan at all.

 

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